Monthly Archives : September 2017

HomeHome2017September
Future Skills header 01

Using social media and scenario thinking to inform directions for Australia’s Vocational Education and Training (VET) system.

The Australian Industry and Skills Committee (AISC)* has published its Future Skills and Training Resource developed by Miles Morgan. The Resource is an innovative exploration of future ways of working and learning impacting Australia’s workplaces, through the lens of social media conversations.

Enhancing strategic thinking capacity to inform VET skills and training

The AISC commissioned the project to ensure that the traditional ways of informing the assessment of training needs (e.g. formal labour market data releases, economic and social reviews and forecast reports) were also complemented by emerging digital data sources. The project aims to ensure Australia’s VET sector has the most current information available on the potential impact and timing of global trends affecting skills and training needs.

Miles Morgan used a strategic foresight approach, which looks for signs of change (trends and megatrends) to develop a set of possible future scenarios. This approach has capacity enhancement at its core. Readers of the Resource are encouraged to use scenarios to help identify gaps and weaknesses in their current systems and start thinking strategically about possible solutions.

A practical ‘hitch-hiker’ guide to the world of workplace change

Once we applied a quality filter to the mined data, we reviewed social media (i.e. Twitter, LinkedIn, online news websites, blogs and forums) from North America, Australasia and the Eurozone to identify/describe global and national trends that are expected to impact skills and training needs relevant to the VET sector. The Resource describes key megatrends categorised under 5 key areas:

  • Society and Culture;
  • Business and Economics;
  • Technology;
  • Resources and Environment; &
  • Political and Institutional.

It also provides details of VET relevant skills, learning and system trends. It combines these trends in different ways to form a series of possible future scenarios, with VET-related implications for employers/industry, learners, government, and the training system.

This resource is intended to stimulate discussion amongst Industry Reference Committees (IRCs) in considering future changes to Training Packages. In addition, broader VET stakeholders will find it useful for preparing their particular sectors to meet the future skills needs of business, learners and workers.

p5, Future Skills and Training

The scenarios are designed to start national conversations about how global megatrends may affect Australia’s different industry sectors and the future skills and training implications.

 

 

*The AISC was established by COAG in 2015 to give industry a formal, expanded role in policy direction and decision-making for the vocational education and training sector. Members include industry leaders nominated by Commonwealth and state and territory ministers responsible for skills and training; a peak body representative (rotating between the Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry, the Business Council of Australia and the Australian Industry Group); and two ex-officio members (senior government officials).

 

2017 WA Export Awards Logo

Miles Morgan nominated finalist in WA Industry & Export Awards 2017

We’re very excited to have been named a finalist in the 2017 Western Australian Industry & Export Awards for our international projects for the OECD, the Government of Saudi Arabia and the Canadian Career Development Foundation. Our amazing team has done it again!

eas17 International EvaluationConference banner

Miles Morgan team present at aes2017 International Evaluation Conference

We’re super excited at Miles Morgan to have been invited to present at the Australasian Evaluation Society’s 2017 International Evaluation Conference, held in Canberra. The theme for the conference this year was “Evaluation Capital”.

The conference theme was two-fold:

Firstly, evaluation is a durable asset for sound governance. That is, longevity and permanence should be built into our evaluation systems because societies with more evaluation capital are better off than those with less.

The second idea concerns the inherently political nature of evaluation, and that evaluation commissioners and practitioners must be sensitive to the effect of politics when making their evaluative choices. (AES 2017)

Our senior consultants, Catherine Manley and Naysa Brasil Teodoro, presented the seminar workshop: Future of evaluation: a collaborative introduction to scenario thinking. The presentation drew on Miles Morgan’s recently published work Future skills and training resource, which was developed for the Australian Industry and Skills Committee (AISC). The interactive session generated much interest and discussion about professionalisation, interdisciplinary working and making use of new technology and data opportunities. 

Thanks to the AES for the photos of our team at the event.

[gallery columns="1" ids="1138,1139,1137"]

 

To view Miles Morgan’s presentation slide Future of evaluation: a collaborative introduction to scenario thinking, which are available to download in PDF format, visit: https://www.aes.asn.au/images/stories/files/conferences/2017/72CatherineManley.pdf

 

Translate »